Pears

The cultivation of the pear in cool temperate climates extends to the remotest antiquity, and there is evidence of its use as a food since prehistoric times. Many traces of it have been found in the Swiss lake-dwellings. The word "pear", or its equivalent, occurs in all the Celtic languages, while in Slavic and other dialects, differing appellations, still referring to the same thing, are found—a diversity and multiplicity of nomenclature which led Alphonse de Candolle to infer a very ancient cultivation of the tree from the shores of the Caspian to those of the Atlantic.

The pear was also cultivated by the Romans, who ate the fruits raw or cooked, just like apples. Pliny's Natural History recommended stewing them with honey and noted three dozen varieties. The Roman cookbook attributed to Apicius, De re coquinaria, has a recipe for a spiced, stewed-pear patina, or soufflé.

A certain race of pears, with white down on the under surface of their leaves, is supposed to have originated from P. nivalis, and their fruit is chiefly used in France in the manufacture of perry - a pear wine and pear liqueur. Other small-fruited pears, distinguished by their early ripening and apple-like fruit, may be referred to as P. cordata, a species found wild in western France and southwestern England. Pears have been cultivated in China for approximately 3000 years.

Pears are among the most popular fruits in the world, and it's no wonder why! They are an excellent source of fiber and a good source of vitamin C for only 100 calories per serving. And, they're sodium free, fat free, and cholesterol free. That's a lot of nutrition in one sweet and juicy package!

Step into Spring with Castle Glen’s preservative free and chemical free line up of ciders, wines, fortifieds, liqueurs, Whiskies, Brandies and Spirits. Whatever your tipple Castle Glen is sure to have it! Visit the Castle Glen Australia Cellar Door on the Granite Belt, or perhaps drop into the delightful Montville Cellar Door for a sampling of this fine fare.